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The Story of Georgia's Painted Buntings
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THE FUTURE OF THE PAINTED BUNTING

A cooperative program entitled the Eastern Atlantic Painted Bunting Working Group was formed in 2001 to address the research and management needs of Painted Bunting populations in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. State and federal biologists and managers, non-governmental organization managers, and interested citizens are cooperating in planning future research on the bunting that will benefit the recovery of its population. Hopefully that recovery will be well underway in the southeastern U. S. by 2015. The Painted Bunting is a species that can exist in harmony with humans, possibly even in developed land. This bird's colorful image, unequaled in our songbirds, as well as its musical song are worth our efforts to maintain its population for future generations of Americans living in our coastal habitats. However, healthy populations of Painted Buntings also mean that our environment is well managed for wildlife and humans. Healthy songbird populations are indicators of a quality environment.

CAN THIS SPECIES SURVIVE?

SELECTED READINGS

Askins, R. A. , J. F. Lynch, and R. Greenberg. 1990. Population declines in migratory birds in eastern North America. Current Ornithology 7:1-57.

Askins, R. A. 1993. Population trends in grassland, shrubland and forest birds in eastern North America. Pp. 1-34, In D. M. Power (ed.). Current Ornithology. Vol. II. Plenum Press, New York.

Brittingham, M. C. and S. A. Temple. 1983. Have cowbirds caused forest songbirds to decline? BioScience 33:31-35.

Hunter, W. C., M. F. Carter, D. N. Pashley, and K. Barker. 1993a. The Partners in Flight species prioritization scheme. Pages 109-119, In D. M. Finch and P. W. Stangel (editors). Status and management of Neotropical migratory birds, 1992 September 21-25, Este Park, Colorado. General Technical Report RM-229. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ft. Collins, Colorado.

Hunter, W. C., D. N. Pashley, R. E. F. Escano., and E. F. Ronald. 1993b. Neotropical migratory landbird species and their habitats of special concern within the Southeast region. Pages 159-169, In D. M. Finch and P. W. Stangel (editors). Status and management of Neotropical migratory birds, 1992 Sept. 21-25, Este Park, Colorado. General Technical Report RM-229. Ft. Collins, Colorado, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station.

James, F. C., D. A. Weidenfield, and C. E. McCulloch. 1992. Trends in breeding populations of warblers: declines in the southern highlands and increases in the lowlands. Pages 43-56 In J. M. Hagan III and D. W. Johnston (editors). Ecology and conservation of Neotropical migrant landbirds. Smithsonian Institute Press, Washington, D.C.

Robbins, C. S., D. Bystrak, and P. H. Geissler. 1986. The breeding bird survey: it's first fifteen years, 1965-1979. U.S. Department of Interior - Fish and Wildlife Service Research Publication 157, Washington, D.C. 196 pages.

Robbins, C. S., J. R. Sauer, R. S. Greenberg, and S. Droege. 1989. Population declines in North American birds that migrate to the Neotropics. Proceeding of the National Academy of Science 86:7658-7662.

Sauer, J. R. and S. Droege. 1992. Geographical patterns in population trends of Neotropical migrants in North America. Pages 43-56 In J. M. Hagan III and D. W. Johnston (editors). Ecology and conservation of Neotropical migrant landbirds. Smithsonian Institute Press, Washington, D.C.

Terborgh, J. 1989. Where have all the birds gone? Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 207 pages.

Terborgh, J. 1992. Perspectives on the conservation of Neotropical migrant landbirds. Pages 7-12 In J. M. Hagan III and D. W. Johnston (editors). Ecology and conservation of Neotropical migrant landbirds. Smithsonian Institute Press, Washington, D.C.

PARTNERS:

USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Athens, Georgia and Laurel, Maryland; The University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forest Resources; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Regional Office, Atlanta, Georgia; and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Warnell School of Forest Resources,USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

The Story of Georgia's Painted Buntings

was written by

J. Michael Meyers, Research Wildlife Biologist, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Warnell School of Forest Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152 with contributions from Lisa K. Duncan and Elizabeth G. Springborn, Warnell School of Forest Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152

Acknowledgements - Dedicated to the 25 student interns and assistants who made this project possible by their good work and deeds.

Web page designed by Jason Derifaj.