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A COMPARISON OF BEHAVIOR FOR TWO COHORTS OF 
CAPTIVE-REARED GREATER SANDHILL CRANES 
RELEASED IN NORTHERN ARIZONA 

DANIEL P. MUMMERT, Northern Arizona University, School of Forestry, P.O. Box 15018, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA

CAROL L. CHAMBERS, Northern Arizona University, School of Forestry, P.O. Box 15018, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA

DAVID H. ELLIS, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, 11410 American Holly Drive, Laurel, MD 20708-4019, USA 

To determine how the behavior of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) changes according to time of year, time of day, and number of days after release, we observed the activities of 2 groups of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes at Mormon Lake, northern Arizona. The behaviors we compared were alert, loafing, sleeping, foraging, preening, locomotion, and other. We found costume-reared subadult greater sandhill cranes that were established at the study site for a year spent more time foraging and being alert towards predators than parent-reared juvenile greater sandhill cranes that were recently released from captivity. We also found that with time juvenile sandhill cranes were increasingly alert and spent less time loafing. It appeared that captive-reared juvenile sandhill cranes learn behavior important for survival from previously released captive-reared cranes. 

PROCEEDINGS NORTH AMERICAN CRANE WORKSHOP 8:145-154 

Key words: Arizona, behavior, costume-rearing, Grus canadensis, parent-rearing, sandhill crane.

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