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Spring 2013 Daily Highlights and Banding counts by species

Summaries and photos credited to Sandy Teliak unless otherwise noted.
Photo captions by bander-in-charge Jo Lutmerding.


Highlights and photos from each banding day are shown by clicking on each date below.
Click the date again to hide the details.

Day 1 , Monday, April 15

Despite the cool, damp weather, we had a good day banding 40 birds/12 species compared to Day 1/2012 (16 Apr) of 21 birds/11 species or Day 1/2011 (15 Apr) of 28/9 species.

We banded no warblers.

Today’s Top species were RCKI/13 and SCJU/9. This is the most RCKI for a Spring banding since 2010, the previous high was RCKI/8 on Day 5/2010 (26 Apr).

We banded our 5th Spring FISP, 4th Spring WIWR and 6th Spring BRTH since Spring 2010. The WIWR do not breed in this area.

We had 8 recaps/7 species to include an overwintering HETH that was banded by us on 29 Oct 2010 and has now been recaptured 17 times since!! We also had a CACH banded by us on 1 Oct 2010 and now recaptured 4 times since. We also recaptured a PRAW banded by us at our nearby MAPS station on 5 Jul 2012. This is an infrequent occurrence.

Photos:

After hatch year Field Sparrow.

Day 2, Wednesday, April 17

We had a slightly above average day banding 26 birds/6 species compared to Day 2/2012 (18 Apr) of 14 birds/9 species or Day 2/2011 (18 Apr) of 39 birds/9 species.

Our YTD total is now 66 birds/13 species compared to YTD/2012 of 35/13 or YTD/2011 of 67/14.

We still have not banded any warblers yet this season.

Our Top species for the day was RCKI/11. So far this season we have banded RCKI/24 and they have all been males. RCKI/M historically precede females to their breeding territory. In our three previous Spring seasons, prior to 22 April, we banded RCKI/M/27 and RCKI/F/2. From 22 April on, we banded RCKI/M/10 and RCKI/F/33.

We had 14 recaps/9 species. Notable recaps included: (1) an AMRE banded by other researchers at PWRC on 1 May 2012; (2) a NOCA banded by us on 15 Apr 2011 and now recaptured 7X since; (3) an AMRO banded by us on 14 May 2010, this was its first recap; and (4) an EATO banded by us on 29 Apr 2012 and now recaptured 7X since.

There were no photo birds today so I attached one of a SSHA that hung around my house this past March and landed/posed on my back deck railing, in the exact same spot, on three separate occasions!

Day 3, Monday, April 22

Despite unseasonably cold weather, we had an average day banding 16 birds/10 species compared to Day 3/2012 (20 Apr) of 13 birds/10 species or Day Three/2011 (20 Apr) of 30 birds/12 species.

Our YTD total is now 81 birds/16 species compared to YTD/2012 of 49/19 or YTD/2011 of 97/19.

We added four new species to our season"s banding list: RTHU/avg. nine per season; HOWR/avg. three per season; HETH/avg. one per season, and our 1st warbler, a WEWA/only our 2nd Spring WEWA since 2010.

As noted in our Day Two recap, we had a heavy RCKI/male presence (24 bandings) in our first two banding days (15,17 Apr) and NO RCKI females. Historically, over 94% of the RCKI female bandings occur after 21 Apr. Today (22 Apr), we banded our 1st RCKI female of the season.

We had three recaps, nothing of consequence.

Today's photo bird is the WEWA (AHY/UNK).

We had a very unusual visitor to our Banding Station environs last Friday and this morning , aWhip-poor-will. Jo Anna heard it on Friday when she opened nets and I heard it this AM when I opened (starting around 0530). Sounded like it was in the vicinity of the banding table initially. As I approached that area, it moved off to the area between net 38 and nets 29/30. It vocalized for at least 10-15 minutes I would guess. I do not know how common Whip-poor-wills are to the PWRC. I do know that only two have been banded since 1980 during the PWRC migration monitoring effort - in Fall 1981 and Fall 1983 - and that's over 87,500 bandings ago.

As late as today, I still have a RBNU coming to my suet feeder at home. It has been a near daily visitor all winter. Wonder how much longer it will be hanging around.

Photos:

After hatch year Worm-eating Warbler.

After hatch year Worm-eating Warbler.

Day 4, Wednesday, April 24

We had a below average day banding 9 birds/5 species compared to Day 4/2012 (24 Apr) of 8/6 or Day 4/2011 (22 Apr) of 28/10.

Our YTD total is now 90 birds/21 species compared to YTD/2012 of 57/20 or YTD/2011 of 125/20.

We banded only our 2nd warbler of the season, a MYWA.

All of today’s bandings were new species for the season: (1) BGGN/we average three per season; today’s BBGN/5 was the most in a single Spring banding session since 2010. The previous single Spring day high was BGGN/3 on 22 April 2011. This station has banded as many as BGGN/8 during a Fall effort on 3 Aug 2001. BGGN breed at PWRC. (2) MYWA/we average 60 per season but that number was heavily skewed by the MYWA/156 bandings in Spring 2012. (3) VEER/this was a relatively early arrival, usually band on average 5 per season. (4) OROR/we average four per season. (5) BHVI/ we average less than one per season, this was the 3rd since 2010.

The Whip-poor-will is still present in the area of the banding desk.

We had 7 recaps/7 species. Of particular note, we recaptured a SOSP that was banded by us on 22 Oct 2007 as an AHY. It has now been recaptured 1X times in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2013. Four of those five recaptures were at net 19!! Talk about site loyalty!!

Photos:

After hatch year female Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

After hatch year female Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

After hatch year male Blue-gray Gnatcather.

After hatch year male Blue-gray Gnatcather.

After hatch year Blue-headed Vireo.

After hatch year Blue-headed Vireo.

After second year male Myrtle Warbler.

After second year male Myrtle Warbler.

After second year male Orchard Oriole.

After second year male Orchard Oriole.

Day 5, Thursday, April 26

We banded only 6 birds/6 species compared to Day 5/2012 (25 Apr) of 6 birds/4 species or Day 5/2011 (25 Apr) of 48 birds/12 species. This ties (with Day 5/2012) for the lowest number of birds banded during a Spring migration effort since 2010.

Our YTD total is now 96 birds/25 species compared to YTD/2012 of 63/20 or YTD/2011 of 173/24.

We added four new species (and two new warblers) to our season’s banding list: (1) PRAW/avg. ten per season; (2) COYE/avg. 80 per season; (3) GRCA/avg. 80 per season, and (4) BLJA/avg. one per season.

The EWPW now has a companion. Two were noted vocalizing this AM near the Banding Station table.

We had 2 recaps/2 species. Nothing of consequence.

Day 6, Friday, April 27

We banded a respectable 23 birds/8 species compared to Day 6/2012 (27 Apr) of 15/6 or Day 6/2011 (27 Apr) of 20/12.

Our YTD total is now 119 birds/28 species compared to YTD/2012 of 78/20 or YTD/2011/193/28.

We added three new species to our season’s banding list to include two new warblers: (1) NAWA/avg. four per season, (2) BWWA/avg. 5 per season, and (3) INBU/avg. 19 per season.

Our YTD warbler total is now 7 warblers/6 species.

The EWPW is still present in the area.

We had 4 recaps/4 species nothing of particular consequence. We did have a recap CACH with a full brood patch. When this CACH was banded on 16 April 2012 it had a brood patch as well.

Photos:

After second year male Blue-winged Warbler.

After second year male Blue-winged Warbler.

Second year male Nashville Warbler.

Second year male Nashville Warbler. The Pyle guide was referenced to help us age this bird by the length of the crown patch and the size of the chestnut centers of the feathers.

After second year male Prairie Warbler.

After second year male Prairie Warbler. Prairie Warblers can be aged via the amount of chestnut in the back and by the presence/absence of molt limits. The picture below shows this male's spread wing and the lack of a molt limit in the alula and carpal covert. The A1, A2, and CC are all dark centered with a fair amount of olive edging.

After second year male Prairie Warbler

Day 7, Monday, April 29

Inclement weather resulted in very low banding numbers again today. We banded only 4 birds/3 species compared to Day 7/20123 (30 Apr) of 62 birds/13 species or Day 7/2011 (29 Apr) of 30 birds/13 species.

We added no new species nor had any recaps.

The EWPW is still vocalizing in the area.

Our YTD total is 124 birds/29 species which is very low compared to our previous 2010-2012 YTD average of 190 birds (range: 141-223)/29 species.

Notable lows include (read: species/previous 3 yr. avg./YTD 2013): WTSP/67.0/23; GRCA/16.7/2, COYE/6/1.

As an aside, I note that our WTSP bandings in Fall 2012 were at record lows. From Fall 2007-2011, we averaged WTSP/226 per season (range: 170-297), in Fall 2012 we had WTSP/167.

Moderate highs include: BGGN/2.3/5; RCKI/21/30.

This week is historically the start of our peak banding period. Our warbler numbers should increase significantly. Historically warblers have accounted for 39-57% of all Spring bandings since 2010. In 2012, we had a significant number of MYWA bandings with MYWA/156. The previous two season average was MYWA/10!!

Day 8, Wednesday, May 1

We continue very, very low banding numbers with only 11 birds/8 species compared to Day 8/2012 (2 May) of 73/21 or Day 8/2011 (2 May) of 38/6.

We added one new species to our station’s Spring banding list: NOMO/1st since 2010

We added two new species to our season’s banding list: WOTH/avg. about 5 per season and TUTI/average about one per season.

Our YTD total is now 135 birds/32 species compared to YTD/2012 of 214/36 or YTD/2011 of 261/35.

The EWPW is still present. Mike Quinlan had several visuals while opening this AM.

We had 7 recaps/7 species all banded by us earlier. We had a NOCA recap banded by us on 16 April 2010 and now recaptured 7X since.

Photos:

After second year female Prairie Warbler.

After second year female Prairie Warbler. This bird was aged by the amount of chestnut on her back, per the Pyle guide, and the uniformity of the alula and carpal covert.

After hatch year male Common Yellowthroat.

After hatch year male Common Yellowthroat.

Day 9, Thursday, May 2

Weather patterns continue to negatively impact our effort. We banded only 13 birds/7 species today compared to Day 9/2012 (3 May) of 134 birds/27 species (the best day of 2012) or Day 9/2011 (3 May) of 46 birds/15 species.

We added one new species to our season’s banding list: BAWW/we avg. 11 per season.

We banded BGGN/2 today bringing our YTD total to BGGN/7 which exceeds the previous best end-of-season high of BGGN/5 in 2011.

The EWPW continues to vocalize extensively in the banding area.

Our YTD is now a very low 148 birds/33 species compared to YTD/2012 of 347/40 or YTD/2011 307/37.

We had three recaps/three species all banded by us either in the Fall or Spring of 2012.

Photos:

After second year male Black-and-White Warbler.

After second year male Black-and-White Warbler. Black-and-White Warblers are one of the easier warblers to age and sex. After second year males typically clearly show uniformity in color and wear across all feathers, including those typically used to detect molt limits, the alula, carpal covert, and primary coverts.

Day 10, Friday, May 3

Easterly winds continue to negatively impact our migration banding. We banded only 25 birds/9 species compared to Day 10/2012 (4 May) of 74 birds/23 species or Day 10/2011 (5 May) of 52 birds/19 species.

We added two new species (one a warbler) to our season’s banding list: YBCH/avg. nine per season and AMGO/avg. less than two per season.

Our YTD total is 173/35 compared to YTD/2012 of 421/44 or YTD/2011 of 359/37 or YTD/2010 of 391/44.

Our YTD warblers numbers are shockingly low: warblers YTD/2013 17/8 compared to YTD/2012 199/15, or YTD/2011 104/17 or YTD/2010 110/19.

We had two recaps/two species banded by us earlier.

Photos:

After second year female American Goldfinch.

After second year female American Goldfinch.

After second year male American Goldfinch.

After second year male American Goldfinch.

After second year female Myrtle Warbler.

After second year female Myrtle Warbler.

Tan morph after hatch year White-throated Sparrow.

Tan morph after hatch year White-throated Sparrow.

After second year male Yellow-breasted chat.

After second year male Yellow-breasted chat.

Both photos above are of an after second year male Yellow-breasted Chat. Yellow-breasted Chats are known to have an eccentric first prebasic molt where they replace their outer primaries and innermost secondaries. In the spring, the lack of a limit within the primaries and secondaries indicates the bird is an after second year, which is a characteristic we used to age this bird.

 

Day 11, Monday, May 6 and Day 12, Tuesday, May 7

Winds from the east and northeast last night continue to negatively impact our banding. We banded only 7 birds/6 species compared to YTD/2012 (7 May) of 58/16, Day 11/2011 (6 May) of 36/16, or Day 11/2010 (10 May) of 27/16.

We added one new species to our season’s banding list: AMRE/we avg. 31 per season.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 180 birds/36 species compared to YTD/2012 of 479/45, YTD/2011 of 395/41 or YTD/2010 of 418/50.

Our YTD warbler total is appallingly low: YTD/2013 of 20/9 compared to YTD/2012 of 255/20 (of which we had MYWA/124 by now!!), YTD/2011 of 199/15 or YTD/2010 of 110/19.

We had no recaps.

Photos:

After second year male American Redstart.

After second year male American Redstart.

Tuesday, May 7

Continued winds last night from the E/ENE/NE continue to hamper Spring migration at this station. We banded only 4 birds/3 species compared to Day 12/2012 (8 May) of 35/16, Day 12/2011 (9 May) 63/20 or Day 12/2010 (12 May) 32/11.

We added one new species to our season’s banding list: REVI/we avg. 13 per season.

Our YTD/2013 total is now 184/37 compared to YTD/2012 of 514/46, YTD/2011 of 460/46 or YTD/2010 of 450/50.

For the first time in 74 banding sessions since 2010, we banded no birds in either the first or second rounds.

We had two recaps/two species banded earlier by us.

No photos

Day 13, Thursday, May 9 and Day 14, Friday, May 10

Winds from the S/SSE/SSW last night/early AM hours improved our banding this morning to a respectable 32 birds/11 species compared to Day 13/2012 (9 May) of 32/13, Day 13/2011 (10 May) of 65/18 or Day 13/2010 (14 May) of 31/14.

We added three new species, to include one warbler species, to our season’s banding list: OVEN/we avg. about 13 per season, BHCO/only the 2nd since 2010 and WCSP/only the 3rdsince 2010.

Top species for the day: WTSP/8 and COYE/7 (all but one were M).

Our YTD/2013 is now 216/40 compared to YTD/2012 of 546/47, YTD/2011 of 497/48 or YTD/2010 of 461/51

We had four recaps/four species. One recap was a COYE banded by us on 14 Sep 2012. We don’t often get COYE recaps from a previous year. In fact, since 2007 we have had recaps of 202 unique COYE during Spring or Fall migration yet only three of them (now four) were banded in the previous year.

Today’s photos include: BHCO (AHY/F), MYWA wing (SY/F) showing molt limit, EWCS (AHY/UNK) plus wing and tail pictures of the WCSP showing pseudo limits in greater coverts and recs.

Photos:

After hatch year female Brown-headed Cowbird.

After hatch year female Brown-headed Cowbird.

after hatch year White-crowned Sparrow

after hatch year White-crowned Sparrow

after hatch year White-crowned Sparrow

The three photos above are of an after hatch year White-crowned Sparrow. According to the Pyle guide, White-crowned Sparrows typically replace 3-7 greater coverts, 2-3 tertials and central rectrices during their prealternate molt. Therefore, while this bird is showing differences in feather color and quality within feather tracts, it cannot be aged an SY due to what is termed "pseudolimits".

The wing of a second year female Myrtle Warbler showing a molt limit within the greater and median coverts.

The wing of a second year female Myrtle Warbler showing a molt limit within the greater and median coverts.

Friday, May 10

Winds from the WSW/W Thursday night and early AM hours of Friday helped some as we banded 33 birds/12 species compared to Day 14/2012 (10 May) of 31/12, Day 14/2011 (11 May) of 61/21 or Day 14/2010 of 72/21.

We added three new species, to include two warbler species, to our season’s banding list: NOWA/avg. 7 per season, CSWA/avg. 11 per season and SCTA/avg. ~2 per season.

The poor weather patterns this Spring that negatively impacted our effort are reflected in our YTD/2013 total of 249 birds/43 species compared to YTD/2012 of 577/48 or YTD/2011 of 584/50 or YTD/2010 of 553/55.

Our YTD warbler numbers are equally paltry: warblers YTD/2013 39/12 compared to warbler YTD/2012 of 330/22, YTD/2011 of 254/21 or YTD/2010 of 209/22.

We had one recap banded by us earlier this spring.

Photos:

After hatch year female American Redstart. While male American Redstarts are very easy to age in the spring, females require a bit more review. Females that have yellow in the inner and outer web of rectrix 3 are indicated to be after second year, if that is lacking, they are second year. This bird was missing some of its tail that did not allow for reliable ageing beyond after hatch year.

After hatch year female American Redstart. While male American Redstarts are very easy to age in the spring, females require a bit more review. Females that have yellow in the inner and outer web of rectrix 3 are indicated to be after second year, if that is lacking, they are second year. This bird was missing some of its tail that did not allow for reliable ageing beyond after hatch year.

After second year male Chestnut-sided Warbler. This bird showed no molt limit and had extensive chestnut down into the flanks.

After second year male Chestnut-sided Warbler. This bird showed no molt limit and had extensive chestnut down into the flanks.

The wing of an after second year Gray Catbird. Second year catbirds typically show molt limits within the greater coverts. This bird's greater coverts were nice and uniform.

The wing of an after second year Gray Catbird. Second year catbirds typically show molt limits within the greater coverts. This bird's greater coverts were nice and uniform.

After hatch year Northern Waterthrush. Notice the flecking in the throat as one characteristic to distinguish this species from Louisiana Waterthrush.

After hatch year Northern Waterthrush. Notice the flecking in the throat as one characteristic to distinguish this species from Louisiana Waterthrush.

After second year female Scarlet Tanager. Scarlet Tanagers, like other birds with gray and/or black wings, can typically be easily and reliably aged by the presence or absence of a molt limit. This bird showed a uniform wing.

After second year female Scarlet Tanager. Scarlet Tanagers, like other birds with gray and/or black wings, can typically be easily and reliably aged by the presence or absence of a molt limit. This bird showed a uniform wing.

After hatch year Swamp Sparrow.

After hatch year Swamp Sparrow.

Day 15, Sunday, May 12

Weather patterns last evening finally worked in our favor. Winds after sunset were from SW/WSW helping to move birds north. Around midnight, winds changed direction and started coming from the NW forcing birds down. We had our best day of the season so far banding 66 birds/16 species compared to Day 15/2012 (11 May) of 42/18, Day 15/2011 (12 May) of 11/8, Day 15/2010 (20 May) of 35/16.

We added five new species, all warblers, to our season’s banding list: BTNW/avg. ~4 per season, MAWA/avg. ~ 38 per season, HOWA/avg. 3 per season, BTBW/avg. 22 per season, CAWA/avg. ~ 12 per season.

We banded 44 warblers/9 species today bringing our YTD warbler total to 83/17.

Our Top Three species today were: COYE/23 (YTD/39), GRCA/8 (YTD/30), and MAWA/7 (YTD/&)

Today’s COYE/23 is a single day high for our Spring effort since 2010. Previous high was COYE/16 on 4 May 2010. With so many birds “backing up” down south, not surprising that we may get record-setting single-day marks. Today’s COYE/23 is the 3rd highest single day total since this station started Fall banding in 1980: COYE/29 on 24 Sep 1995 and COYE/25 on 28 Sep 1986.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 315 birds/48 species compared to YTD/2012 of 619/50, YTD/2011 of 595/51 or YTD/2010 of 587/56.

We had 4 recaps/3 species. One recap was of a COYE we banded in Fall 2012. As noted on Day Thirteen, it is unusual for us to get COYE recaps that were banded the previous year. This is only the 5th such instance out of just over 200 unique COYE recaps since 2007.

The Whip-poor-will continues to serenade whomever is opening nets. We now have at least two in the banding area.

After second year female Black-throated Blue Warbler.

After second year female Black-throated Green Warbler (top) and Second year male Black-throated Green warbler (bottom).  Determining the ages of both of these birds first, based on the presence or absence of a molt limit, was necessary to accurately determine the sex.  The bird on the top had a uniform wing and the high amount of flecking in the throat indicated this bird must be a female.  For a comparison, the bird on the bottom showed a molt limit and the amount of black in the throat for a second year bird indicated this bird must be a male.

After second year female Black-throated Green Warbler (top) and Second year male Black-throated Green warbler (bottom). Determining the ages of both of these birds first, based on the presence or absence of a molt limit, was necessary to accurately determine the sex. The bird on the top had a uniform wing and the high amount of flecking in the throat indicated this bird must be a female. For a comparison, the bird on the bottom showed a molt limit and the amount of black in the throat for a second year bird indicated this bird must be a male.

After second year female Canada Warbler (top) and after second year male Canada Warbler (bottom).After second year female Canada Warbler (top) and after second year male Canada Warbler (bottom).

After second year female Canada Warbler (top) and after second year male Canada Warbler (bottom).

After hatch year female Hooded Warbler.  Females of this species are more difficult to accurately age whereas males typically show obvious differences in the amount of black in the hood to assist with ageing.  Molt limits in this species are difficult to detect.

After hatch year female Hooded Warbler. Females of this species are more difficult to accurately age whereas males typically show obvious differences in the amount of black in the hood to assist with ageing. Molt limits in this species are difficult to detect.

After second year male Indigo Bunting.  We recently learned from a Pyle publication that INBUs have been found to molt some of their primaries and secondaries in their pre-alternate molt, creating pseudo-limits.  Therefore, ageing should be based on differences of color and quality within the wing coverts.

After second year male Indigo Bunting. We recently learned from a Pyle publication that INBUs have been found to molt some of their primaries and secondaries in their pre-alternate molt, creating pseudo-limits. Therefore, ageing should be based on differences of color and quality within the wing coverts.

Day 16, Monday, May 13

We had an above average day with 47 birds banded/15 species compared to Day 16/2012 (14 May) of 12/7, Day 16/2011 (13 May) of 19/12 or Day 16/2010 (21 May) of 20/13. This was better than I expected given last night’s winds from the WNW at upwards of 15 mph.

We added two new species, one a warbler, to our season’s banding list: NOPA/avg. ~14 per season and CARW/avg. ~ 1 per season.

Today’s Top Species were: COYE/11, GRCA/8 and WTSP/8.

We banded an INBU ASY/F with an unusual amount of blue feathering on the crown of the head. Pyle makes no mention of such feathering. See attached photo.

We banded a “late” RCKI. Since 2010, we’ve not banded RCKI past 7 May. This one may have been “stuck” down south.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 362 birds/50 species compared to YTD/2012 of 632/50, YTD/2011 of 614/51 and YTD/2010 of 607/57.

We had 7 recaps of 5 species all banded by us earlier this season with one exception. We had a PRAW recap originally banded by us on 18 April 2011. This is now its 3X recap.

After second year female Indigo Bunting with an unusual bright blue crown patch.  This bird is showing aberrant plumage for a female INBU with the crown patch and we concluded that a female exhibiting this much coloration must be an after second year.

After second year female Indigo Bunting with an unusual bright blue crown patch. This bird is showing aberrant plumage for a female INBU with the crown patch and we concluded that a female exhibiting this much coloration must be an after second year.

The wing of a male second year Black-throated Blue Warbler showing a molt limit in the alula.  The A1 (first alula feather) and CC (carpal covert) are uniform with dark centers and wide blue edging while A2 (second alula feather) is a retained juvenile feather that is duller and lacking blue edging.

The wing of a male second year Black-throated Blue Warbler showing a molt limit in the alula. The A1 (first alula feather) and CC (carpal covert) are uniform with dark centers and wide blue edging while A2 (second alula feather) is a retained juvenile feather that is duller and lacking blue edging.

Day 17, Tueday, May 14

Given that winds were from the NNW/NW last night, our expectations for today weren’t too high.  We banded 28 birds/15 species compared to Day 17/2012 (16 May) 19/13, Day 16/2011 (16 May) 51/19 or Day 17/2010 (24 May) 23/13.

We added no new species to our season’s banding list.

We banded another “late” RCKI. Normally by 10 May they will have passed through already.

Our YTD/2013 warbler totals continue to be an anemic. YTD/2013 124 warblers/18 species compared to warbler YTD/2012 of 378/22 or YTD/2011 of 310/22 or YTD/2010 of 253/23.

Overall banding numbers continue to set new lows: YTD/2013 390 birds/50 species compared to YTD/2012 651/51, YTD/2011 of 665/52 or YTD/2010 613/59.

Photos:

Second year male Northern Cardinal. Typically Northern Cardinals replace all of their feathers during their prebasic molt, making ageing them beyong after after hatch year in the spring difficult. This bird didn't replace some of its secondaries during its first pre-basic molt, which is obvious from the brown rachi and the poor quality that contributed to the extreme wear.

Second year male Northern Cardinal. Typically Northern Cardinals replace all of their feathers during their prebasic molt, making ageing them beyong after after hatch year in the spring difficult. This bird didn't replace some of its secondaries during its first pre-basic molt, which is obvious from the brown rachi and the poor quality that contributed to the extreme wear.

 

Day 18, Wednesday, May 15

Winds from the SSE last night probably helped push some birds up north. We banded 45 birds/18 species compared to Day 18/2012 (18 May) of 25 birds/11 species or Day 18/2011 (17 May) of 18/8 or Day 18/2010 (26 May) of 22/11.

We added three new species to our season’s banding list: ACFL (our 1st empid of the season)/avg. about two per season; MOWA/avg. about one per season, and LISP/ avg. about one per season.

We banded OVEN/5 which is the most in a single day since 2010.

Relatively speaking we had a decent warbler day banding 32 warblers/11 species.

We banded HOWR/1 bringing our season total to HOWR/6. Our end-of-season avg. is only HOWR/3.

We had 16 recaps of 8 species all banded by us earlier this season except for one banded last year.

Photos:

The tail of a second year female American Redstart. According to the Pyle guide, the 3rd rectrix (count down from the outer feather starting at 6) of a SY female AMRE will have yellow in the outer web and sometimes a small yellow spot on the inner web of this feather.

The tail of a second year female American Redstart. According to the Pyle guide, the 3rd rectrix (count down from the outer feather starting at 6) of a SY female AMRE will have yellow in the outer web and sometimes a small yellow spot on the inner web of this feather.

Always a fun species to encounter during spring migration banding, an after hatch year Lincoln's Sparrow.

Always a fun species to encounter during spring migration banding, an after hatch year Lincoln's Sparrow.

Day 19, Thursday, May 16

Migrants continue to filter through. We banded 32 birds/12 species compared to Day 19/2012 (23 May) of 14 birds/11 species, or Day 19/2011 (18 May) 20/10 or Day 19/2010 (28 May) 7/5.

We added a new warbler species to our season’s banding list: BLPW/we avg. about three per season.

Today’s BLPW/2 is the first time we’ve banded more than one in one banding session since 2010

Today’s LISP/3 brings our YTD to LISP/4 which sets a new end-of-season record since 2010.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 467 birds/54 species compared to YTD/2012 of 690/53, or YTD/2011 of 703/53 or YTD/2010 of 659/60.

Our warblers totals - while improving - are still way below average. Warbler YTD/2013 174 warblers/20 species compared to YTD/2012 of 394/22, or YTD/2011 of 338/21 or YTD/2010 of 256/23.

Our Top Five warblers species YTD are (read: species/YTD 2013/3-yr. end-of-season avg.): COYE/62/80, MAWA/22/38, BTBW/13/22, AMRE/12/31, OVEN/9/13.

We had six recaps/six species all banded by us earlier this season or last year.

Immediately after net opening, a red bat flew into one of the nets. It was carefully removed and released.

Day 20, Friday, May 17

We continue to band at an above normal rate as migrants continue moving through during this late Spring migration season. We banded 38 birds/16 species compared to Day 20/2012 (24 May) of 19 birds/11 species or Day 12/2011 (20 May) of 12 birds/7 species. There was no Day 20 in 2010.

We added one new species to our station’s Spring banding list: BBWA. This brings to 72 the number of species banded during our Spring effort since 2010. Of those 72 species, 26 are warblers. In contrast, our Fall migration banding effort since 1980 has 123 banded species (40 warblers species).

Besides the aforementioned BBWA, we added three new species to our season’s banding list: WIWA/avg. about three per season, TRFL/avg. 2 per season, and SWTH/ avg. about ten per season.

Our Top Two species for the day were: MAWA/9 and COYE/8 – both species approaching their end-of-season avg : MAWA/31 YTD/38 end-of-season avg. and COYE/70/80. With three more banding days left in the season, we may reach avg. numbers in several species.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 505/58, YTD/2012 709/53 and YTD/2011 of 715/53.

We had no recaps.

Day 21, Monday, May 20

Despite winds from the south last night, we banded only 19 birds/9 species compared to Day 21/2012 (25 May) of 10 birds/6 species or Day 21/2011 (23 May) of 20/10. There was no Day 21 in 2010.

We added one new species to our season’s banding list: CEDW. Since Spring 2010, we have banded CEDW/14 with CEDW/11 in 2012 alone! Today’s CEDW was captured in Net 38 which seems to be a popular area for CEDW. Since 2007, between our Fall and Spring migration efforts, we have banded CEDW/19. Of those 19, fully fifteen were captured in adjacent nets 38 (4x), 37 (6x), and 36 (5x). Net 35 (1x) and Net 7 (2x) account for the other captures.

Today’s COYE/10 brings us to YTD COYE/80 which is COYE’s end-of-season average. COYE will probably be one of the few species this year to meet/exceed its 3-yr. end-of-season average.

Our YTD total is now YTD/2013 of 524 birds/59 species or YTD/2012 of 719/53 or YTD/2011 of 735/53.

We had two recaps/two species both banded by us earlier this season.

 

Totals:

                                             
Common Name 04/15 04/17 04/22 04/24 04/25 04/26 04/29 05/01 05/02 05/03 05/06 05/07 05/09 05/10 05/12 05/13 05/14 05/15 05/16 05/17 05/20 Total
RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD - - 1 - - - - - - 2 - - - - - 4 - 1 1 - - 9
WHITE-EYED VIREO 1 - - - - - - - - - 1 - 1 1 1 - 1 - - - - 6
BLUE-HEADED VIREO - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
BLUE JAY - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
CAROLINA CHICKADEE 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - 2 - - - - 5
TUFTED TITMOUSE - - - - - - - 1 2 - - - - - - - - - 2 - - 5
HOUSE WREN - - 1 - - - - - 1 - - - 2 - - 2 - 1 - - - 7
WINTER WREN 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2
BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER - - - 5 - - - - 2 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - 8
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET 13 11 3 - - 3 - 2 - - - - 4 4 3 2 1 - - - - 46
VEERY - - - 1 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - 3
HERMIT THRUSH - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
WOOD THRUSH - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - 2
AMERICAN ROBIN 2 - 3 - - - 1 1 - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - 8
GRAY CATBIRD - - - - 1 1 - - 1 3 - - 4 12 8 16 1 5 - 2 - 54
NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
BROWN THRASHER 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
BLUE-WINGED WARBLER - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
NASHVILLE WARBLER - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
MYRTLE WARBLER - - - 1 - - 1 - - 1 - - 2 - - - 3 - - 1 - 9
PRAIRIE WARBLER - - - - 1 1 - 1 - 1 2 2 - - - - - - - - - 8
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - 1 - - 1 3
WORM-EATING WARBLER - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - - - - 1 - - 2 - 2 - - 7 4 23 22 7 4 1 8 10 91
EASTERN TOWHEE 1 - 1 - - - - - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - 4
FIELD SPARROW 1 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2
SWAMP SPARROW 4 6 - - - 5 - 2 - - - - 1 2 3 - 1 - 1 - 1 26
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW 5 6 - - - 10 2 - 5 10 - 1 8 4 5 16 1 - 1 3 - 77
SLATE-COLORED JUNCO 9 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10
NORTHERN CARDINAL - 1 3 - 1 - - - - 3 1 - - - - - 1 - - 1 - 11
INDIGO BUNTING - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - 1 2 - - 3 - 1 8
ORCHARD ORIOLE - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH - - - - - - - - - 2 - - - - - - - - - - - 2
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - 1 2 - 1 1 - 2 8
AMERICAN REDSTART - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - 1 1 - 1 6 2 2 1 15
RED-EYED VIREO - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - 2 3 3 2 2 - 13
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - 1
EASTERN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - 1
OVENBIRD - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - 4 - 5 1 1 - 12
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1 2 - 2 2 1 - 9
SCARLET TANAGER - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1 - - - - - - 2
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - 3 1 - - 5
MAGNOLIA WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 4 2 5 6 9 1 34
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 2 2 - - - - 6
HOODED WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - 1
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 6 1 3 2 2 - 18
CANADA WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 - 1 1 - 1 - 7
NORTHERN PARULA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6 - - - - 1 7
CAROLINA WREN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 - - - - - 2
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - 1
MOURNING WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - 1
LINCOLN'S SPARROW - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 3 - - 4
BLACKPOLL WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 - - 2
WILSON'S WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 - 2
TRAILL'S FLYCATCHER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - 1
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - 1
SWAINSON'S THRUSH - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - 1
CEDAR WAXWING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1
Total 40 26 16 9 6 23 4 11 13 25 7 4 32 33 66 94 28 47 32 39 19 574